Daytona Beach Law Firm Won Third-Largest Award for the State

Doran Sims Wolfe and Ciocchetti

Doran Sims Wolfe and Ciocchetti
Image: doranlaw.com

Ted Doran possesses more than three decades of legal experience, the majority of which he has garnered as an attorney with Doran Sims Wolfe and Ciocchetti in Daytona Beach, Florida. In 2013, Ted Doran and his team won a $15 million judgement for the state–the third-largest award in Florida’s history.

The noteworthy amount was awarded following a case against BB&T bank, regarding certificates of deposit that the bank acquired in its purchase of the assets of the defunct Colonial Bank from the government.

The initial trial closed in June 2012, but BB&T appealed the ruling and lost once again in November 2013. The money won from the judgement was applied to the receivership estate of two failed insurance companies.

The case was the law firm’s second among the top three awards for Florida. Attorneys at Doran Sims Wolfe and Ciocchetti were also responsible for a 2005 judgement that won the state more than $20 million in a breach of contract suit against a medical malpractice insurance company.

Quoted in a local newspaper in 2013, Mr. Doran granted credit for the most recent award to Florida’s chief financial officer and his pursuance of claims like the BB&T suit.

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How Legal Counsel Can Work for School Boards

Ted Doran pic

Ted Doran
Image: doranlaw.com

Florida attorney Ted Doran has represented the Volusia County School Board since 2002, providing advice on legal issues, policy, and litigation matters. Lawyers employed by local school districts provide valuable services as the school boards navigate an often confusing set of local, state, and federal laws that pertain to schools.

The main goal is to avoid litigation and legal missteps that occur when making policies for the local school system. When litigation does occur, the legal counsel represents the school board before the court.

In some cases, the attorney will give advice on the information board members should discuss publicly during controversial proceedings, as Ted Doran did in 2015 when the Volusia County School Board was negotiating with the teachers’ union over the current contracts. Other times, the attorney will give advice in regard to the contracts and appointments of the school board itself.

Legal Matters in Plain Language – What Does a Receiver Do?

Ted Doran pic

Ted Doran
Image: doranlaw.com

Daytona Beach, Florida, attorney Ted Doran has over 30 years’ experience in law. He is versed in civil litigation and representation of government entities in complex legal issues. In 2013, Ted Doran achieved on behalf of the State of Florida a $15 million judgement, the third-largest award in a Florida receivership.

The Florida Department of Financial Services, Division of Rehabilitation and Liquidation administers insurance companies that are placed into receivership in Florida. Under Florida Statutes (Chapter 631), the receivership can be for purposes of rehabilitation or liquidation.

The Receiver, as the rehabilitator, has wide discretion to prepare a plan to assist a company to resolve its difficulties. The Receiver is responsible for taking actions necessary to correct the conditions that necessitated the receivership. By statute and court order the Receiver is authorized to conduct all business of the insurer, may direct, manage, hire, and discharge employees, is authorized to manage the property and assets of the insurer as it deems necessary and may file for release of the company from receivership if rehabilitation efforts are successful and grounds for receivership no longer exist. When an insurance company cannot be rehabilitated, the Department petitions the court to place the company into liquidation.

In liquidation proceedings, the Receiver takes possession of the assets of the insurer and administers the assets. The Receiver also assists in the transition of policyholders to other insurance coverage, conducts investigations into the causes of the insolvency, collects all money due the insurer, litigates, as necessary, to recover any funds that may be owed to the insurer, sells assets such as real and personal property and evaluates and pays claims with available assets.

Differences Between Trial Court and Appeal Court in Florida

Ted Doran pic

Ted Doran
Image: doranlaw.com

Attorney Ted Doran serves as senior partner at the law firm of Doran Sims Wolfe & Ciocchetti in Daytona Beach, Florida. An alumnus of the University of Florida College of Law with extensive experience in civil litigation, Ted Doran has represented multiple government agencies in major cases. As the attorney for the Volusia County school board, Mr. Doran represented the school district in a case on school funding heard before Florida’s Second Judicial Circuit Court and the First District Court of Appeal.

Also called courts of general jurisdiction, Florida Circuit Courts use a two-tiered system of lower county courts and higher circuit courts. These courts are where cases originate and only affect the individuals directly involved in the case. Since they also hear appeals from county court cases, Florida Circuit Courts are the lowermost appellate court and the uppermost trial court in the state.

A Court of Appeal, sometimes referred to as an appellate court, reviews cases decided by lower trial courts. In Florida, there are five district Courts of Appeal that are responsible for ensuring that no errors in judgment occur. In a court of appeals case, a panel of judges reviews the lower court case and determines whether the lower court reached the right decision.

Since Court of Appeal cases set a precedent on the interpretation and application of law, they have the potential to affect many people. The ultimate court in the state is the Florida Supreme Court.